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Does Adult Aquired Flat Foot Need To Have Surgery ?

on March 23, 2015

Overview

PTTD is a condition of degeneration and dysfunction in the tendon complex that helps control the medial arch of your foot. Essentially what happens is the complex is unable to do its job of supporting the arch and supinating the foot, so a progressive flat foot develops (usually called adult acquired flat foot). Initially pain and often swelling develops on the inside of the ankle and it will continue to get progressively worse. There are a number of stages of PTTD (3 Stages) and it needs to be aggressively treated early on otherwise a surgical reconstruction of the arch will invariably be required. PTTD can develop into a very disabling condition if it is not dealt with properly and promptly. As PTTD becomes more advanced, the arch flattens even more and the pain often shifts to the outside of the foot, below the ankle. Arthritis often develops in the foot and In more severe cases, arthritis may also develop in the ankle.Adult Acquired Flat Foot


Causes

Obesity – Overtime if your body is carrying those extra pounds, you can potentially injure your feet. The extra weight puts pressure on the ligaments that support your feet. Also being over weight can lead to type two diabetes which also can attribute to AAFD. Diabetes – Diabetes can also play a role in Adult Acquired Flatfoot Deformity. Diabetes can cause damage to ligaments, which support your feet and other bones in your body. In addition to damaged ligaments, uncontrolled diabetes can lead to ulcers on your feet. When the arches fall in the feet, the front of the foot is wider, and outer aspects of the foot can start to rub in your shoe wear. Patients with uncontrolled diabetes may not notice or have symptoms of pain due to nerve damage. Diabetic patient don?t see they have a problem, and other complications occur in the feet such as ulcers and wounds. Hypertension – High blood pressure cause arteries narrow overtime, which could decrease blood flow to ligaments. The blood flow to the ligaments is what keeps the foot arches healthy, and supportive. Arthritis – Arthritis can form in an old injury overtime this can lead to flatfeet as well. Arthritis is painful as well which contributes to the increased pain of AAFD. Injury – Injuries are a common reason as well for AAFD. Stress from impact sports. Ligament damage from injury can cause the bones of the foot to fallout of ailment. Overtime the ligaments will tear and result in complete flattening of feet.


Symptoms

The symptoms of PTTD may include pain, swelling, a flattening of the arch, and an inward rolling of the ankle. As the condition progresses, the symptoms will change. For example, when PTTD initially develops, there is pain on the inside of the foot and ankle (along the course of the tendon). In addition, the area may be red, warm, and swollen. Later, as the arch begins to flatten, there may still be pain on the inside of the foot and ankle. But at this point, the foot and toes begin to turn outward and the ankle rolls inward. As PTTD becomes more advanced, the arch flattens even more and the pain often shifts to the outside of the foot, below the ankle. The tendon has deteriorated considerably and arthritis often develops in the foot. In more severe cases, arthritis may also develop in the ankle.


Diagnosis

The diagnosis of tibialis posterior dysfunction is essentially clinical. However, plain radiographs of the foot and ankle are useful for assessing the degree of deformity and to confirm the presence or absence of degenerative changes in the subtalar and ankle articulations. The radiographs are also useful to exclude other causes of an acquired flatfoot deformity. The most useful radiographs are bilateral anteroposterior and lateral radiographs of the foot and a mortise (true anteroposterior) view of the ankle. All radiographs should be done with the patient standing. In most cases we see no role for magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasonography, as the diagnosis can be made clinically.


Non surgical Treatment

Treatment of Adult Acquired Flatfoot Deformity depends on the stage of progression, as mentioned above paragraphs. Below we will outline a variety of different treatment options available. Orthotics or bracing. To give your foot the arch the support it needs, your podiatrist or foot specialist may provide you with over the counter brace or a custom orthotic device that fits your shoe. Casting. In some cases, a cast or boot is worn to stabilize the foot and to give the tendon time to heal. Physiotherapy. Ultrasound treatments and exercises may help rehab the tendon and muscles. Medications. Over-the-counter (NSAIDS) such as ibuprofen can help reduce pain, inflammation and swelling associated with AAFD. Shoe Gear. Your podiatrist may suggest changes with your shoes you are wearing and inserts you need in your shoe to help support your arch.

Flat Foot


Surgical Treatment

In cases where cast immobilization, orthoses and shoe therapy have failed, surgery is the next alternative. The goal of surgery and non-surgical treatment is to eliminate pain, stop progression of the deformity and improve mobility of the patient. Opinions vary as to the best surgical treatment for adult acquired flatfoot. Procedures commonly used to correct the condition include tendon debridement, tendon transfers, osteotomies (cutting and repositioning of bone) and joint fusions. (See surgical correction of adult acquired flatfoot). Patients with adult acquired flatfoot are advised to discuss thoroughly the benefits vs. risks of all surgical options. Most procedures have long-term recovery mandating that the correct procedure be utilized to give the best long-term benefit. Most flatfoot surgical procedures require six to twelve weeks of cast immobilization. Joint fusion procedures require eight weeks of non-weightbearing on the operated foot – meaning you will be on crutches for two months. The bottom line is, Make sure all of your non-surgical options have been covered before considering surgery. Your primary goals with any treatment are to eliminate pain and improve mobility. In many cases, with the properly designed foot orthosis or ankle brace, these goals can be achieved without surgical intervention.

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